Folk Alliance 2019 Part Two: Who I Discovered

Hello again! As promised, here is part two of my Folk Alliance posts. This one focuses on the my favorite FA artists who I either met in person for the first time or reconnected with from previous travels. If you missed my first post, which tells you what Folk Alliance is and focuses on my main takeaways from the week, you can click here to catch up! One of those takeaways had to do with what type of artist I resonate with the most. I realized that I connect best with performers who not only play well, but also have a unique persona that shines through in their music. I highly encourage you to look these artists up, listen to their music, and if possible see them perform live.

So many talented artists all gathered together in this building!

Old Friends:

I was thrilled when I saw that both Andrew Finn Magill and Emerald Rae were performing at Folk Alliance this year (click on their names to check out their websites)! Finn was my first “real” fiddle teacher when I started attending the Swannanoa Gathering Celtic Week at Warren Wilson College in North Carolina. I know him the best for his Irish music, but in the past few years he has been focusing on Brazilian styles — which also sound amazing. He played several sets with his friend and bandmate, Cesar Garabini, who is an absolute wizard at the seven string guitar. I credit Finn for giving me the necessary tips I needed to shift my sound from classical violinist to Irish fiddler. He’s also great at providing disciplined practice tips, which is an area I’m always looking to improve!

Emerald Rae was another one of my fiddle teachers from Swannanoa, this time focusing on Cape Breton music. To this day, I still love to play the tunes she taught in that class — she’s got a real knack for picking some great repertoire! Like Finn, Emerald has retained her traditional music background, but has also transitioned into a new style: singer-songwriter. Her latest self-titled album is full of her own compositions written for fiddle accompanying voice. Let me tell you, it is not easy to sing and play at the same time, but Emerald is absolutely brilliant at it. She is exploring and pushing boundaries of what the fiddle and voice can do to create a one-woman show. She also experiments with cross tuning and medieval music, which gives her a unique vibe and really showcases her powerhouse fiddling. Can you tell she’s one of my role models?

From Andrew Finn Magill and Emerald Rae’s Instagram pages. Reproduced with permission.

New Friends (thank you, Instagram!):

There were also some familiar faces at Folk Alliance thanks to the virtual world of the internet — mostly due to Instagram and the Celtic Colours Festival Livestream from Cape Breton. Tristan Henderson of Vermont trio, Pete’s Posse, was one such Instagram connection. He has been really supportive of me ever since I started to market my music more online, so it was wonderful to meet him and hear him play in person! He’s one of the friendliest musicians I’ve ever met and also quite possibly the owner of the biggest jaw harp collection that I know.

Another Celtic Colour/Instagram discovery was April Verch. April is an amazing virtuosic Canadian fiddler from the Ottawa Valley region, but also knowledgeable of other Canadian regional styles. She was performing with her trio at Folk Alliance, and I must have dropped in to listen to almost all of her showcases. She fiddles, sings, and step dances — sometimes at the same time! I ended up taking a master class with her during the week to learn about the stylistic differences among the Canadian regional fiddle traditions, which was really fascinating to compare to what I’ve learned about Irish regional styles. She taught the class a Métis (French, Irish and Native American influenced) version of The Arkansas Traveler as well as an Ottawa Valley (in Ontario) style jig. I could definitely hear similarities between the Ottawa Valley and Appalachian fiddling, both of which have ancestral root meanings to me! April has just released a new album, “Once a Day,” where she’s exploring more 50’s Canadian country repertoire — absolutely adore her and her music!

Album cover from April Verch's latest release, "Once a Day."
Reproduced with April’s permission. Check out her new album!

While I didn’t end up speaking to any of these guys, I also got to see Le Vent du Nord in person. WOW. I barely have any other words. Despite my minimal knowledge of the French language, they were one of the most engaging groups of musicians I’ve ever had the pleasure to watch perform. Also one of the guys plays a hurdy-gurdy, which is just awesome in and of itself. Another string instrument for me to try…

Other Favorite Musical Acts:

Rising Appalachia: I was introduced to this wonderful band by a fellow American student and friend of mine in Cork, who shares my deep love for my homeland in the southeastern United States. She and I even worked up their version of “Across the Blue Ridge Mountains” to sing in the weekly sessions we attended at the Blarney Castle Hotel. However, I was in no way prepared for their performance at Folk Alliance. Jam packed into a small hotel room with thirty to forty other people, I experienced the most soul-fulfilling music I have felt in a long time. Their beautiful harmonies and arrangements of classic Old Time tunes brought me right back home to the Piedmont/Mountain region of North Carolina, and really reached my core. To me, they represent true “Roots” music: they bring everything back to the lay of the land, how we occupy it, and how we use it to serve one another. They share an idea of how to manifest all of our gifts on this earth, and it really sunk in with me… also they have the classiest hats! Lastly, they just released a new album called Leylines, which focuses on the musical alignment of traditions from the southeastern US, Ireland, and Africa. Y’all, it’s a true work of art!!

Rising Appalachia joined by Finn Magill — seriously the most magical showcase, y’all!

Adam Agee and Jon Sousa: I accidentally stumbled upon these two Colorado-based musicians as I was wandering down the hotel corridor. There was some beautiful fiddle/guitar music trailing out of a room that stopped me in my tracks, made me turn around and make a beeline for its source. Jon spent some time at University of Limerick, where he developed his knowledge of singing in the Irish language, and it was an absolute pleasure to speak to them both after their set! I’m always glad to meet fellow musicians who have had similar Irish experiences to my own — and I really hope to catch these two for some tunes one of these days!

The East Pointers: These guys actually came to Petoskey a little over a year ago, and played at Red Sky Stage — love their energy, their banter in between sets, and their songs! They’ve definitely got a traditional sound at their roots, but they use it to tell their own story of their travels and upbringing. Both of my favorite songs of theirs, “82 Fires” and “Two Weeks,” shed light on different hardships: wildfire threats in Tanzania and the economically challenging work environment in the Canadian Maritimes. Even though their songs focus on specific events or geographical areas, the themes are relatable worldwide and really have the ability to reach a variety of audience members. On top of that, they are genuinely nice people, which is always a plus in my book!

Additional Acts I Enjoyed:

Riviere Rouge – April Verch recommended this Canadian Métis trio — wonderfully friendly guys who, like Le Vent du Nord, have the ability to connect through their music with both their French and English speaking audiences. I thoroughly enjoyed my first major introduction to Metis music thanks to them!

Nava – These guys are an Irish/Persian quartet using instruments and repertoire from both traditions. Often times I shy away from groups that blend a bunch of different styles because I think they lose that traditionally rooted approach — not the case with these guys! They honor both Irish and Persian culture and put together a truly enjoyable set!

The Lumber Jills – If my best friends from childhood and I had ever played music together, it would be like this quartet of young girls from Cape Breton. They clearly enjoy playing music together, and I hope to go to the Celtic Colours Festival one of these years to hear them play again!

The Fretless – Classical string quartet meets fiddling repertoire. I didn’t get to see them live, but Chris did and got them on video for me. Recently, I’ve started to get more involved in my local classical music scene, so I think I have a new project in the works…

Gus La Casse – Gus is a fantastic Acadian fiddler, and really throws himself into the music! His energy immediately transforms his surrounding environment. He played a few showcases with Tristan Henderson, and between the two of them I felt as though I’d dropped into a concert environment flow that only masters of tradition can pull off! Seriously amazing musicianship!!

Pumpkin Bread Band – One of my roommates from the Swannanoa Gathering, Maura Scanlin, is the fiddle player from this band. Having heard her play before, I knew I’d have to see them in showcase — Maura puts such heart and soul into her fiddling and she’s a pleasure to listen to! Her band was great too — they just released their debut CD, and I look forward to hearing more of their work!

There were many more artists that I didn’t get around to listen to at Folk Alliance due to the sheer volume of simultaneous showcases, but the artists listed above all stood out to me for their own reasons. It was truly an honor to meet such wonderful musicians and reconnect with others who I consider as mentors. The beauty of these conferences are the connections made and the chance to experience some fantastic musical moments. I highly encourage y’all to surround yourself with music that lifts you, inspires you, challenges you, and makes you feel a deep connection to this world and your life in it. Comment below if any of these artists resonate with you, and better yet reach out and tell them how much their music means to you!

Special thanks to this guy for making the trip to Folk Alliance possible! Here’s to many more music travels in the future! PC: Tin Can Photography

2 thoughts on “Folk Alliance 2019 Part Two: Who I Discovered”

  1. this is great! keep up the good work, Hannah! I’d heard of many of the performers, but I think Finn is the only one I’ve met.

    1. Thanks, Dave! Did you ever get to hear Emerald play? She taught back in 2015, I took her Cape Breton class. Glad you enjoyed it and thanks so much for following along!

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